Monday, 11 March 2013

WHO IS TALKING?



The Point Of View you choose for your narrator is one of the most important decisions you make as a writer, but there are choices.

          You can use first person P.O.V. where everything is written from the viewpoint of one character; second person P.O.V.  – which is more unusual – where the main character is referred to as you (‘You want scream, but you don’t...); the final, and most commononly used, option is the third person (aka as omniscient) P.O.V. where the writer uses he or she in telling the story. 

            I really admire those writers who can use first or second person as my preference is for the third person P.O.V. It feels the most natural for me and I like that I can see both inside characters’ heads and what is going on around them.  But there are different ways of using this viewpoint.


 1.      Complete omniscience: your narrator knows everything about all the characters, events and places in your story.
2.      Objective third person: your narrator knows only what can be seen externally and recounts it naturally.
3.      Limited omniscience: your narrator knows everything about one particular character, thoughts, feelings etc., but nothing about other characters other than what your chosen character knows.

The last is my favourite and I’m using it in both strands of my novel. Strand A is fairly straightforward as there is only one main character whose journey I want to tell. However, in strand B there are two characters, and I’m attempting to write about both their struggles. 

The balance of focus between the two characters is around 60-40 with the centre of attention in one chapter being on one of them, and in the next on the other. This becomes tricky when they’re together (which is naturally often...) but I’m sticking to the advice I received about P.O.V.  – be consistent. I won’t know till I’m finished and and have some distance if I’ve succeeded.

Last week, after a several intensive rewrites, I won that throw down wrestling match with my order of events and I have to admit it was very satisfying. It feels good to be making progress as I have only six chapters left before completing the first major editing sweep of strand B, and at two chapters a week - if I keep it up - I’ll be on schedule for finishing by the end of March. Yeah!

Today’s Haiku

COFFEE SHOP HAIKU 1

She leans forward; eyes
flash, hands wave, voice low, intense.
His eyes glaze over.

Haikus Galore is on the back burner but I have a plan – I just have to put it into action (like all my other plans...).

Check out a book of short stories called Roads Taken by M. Joaquim at the Kindle Store, ebook only. It’s a thoroughly enjoyable little book.


Here are a couple of websites about writing whose advice helps me in my writing;


And if you haven’t read Stephen King’s book ‘On Writing’, I would suggest you do.

For all book lovers out there, I wish you good reading and for those of you who write, good writing.


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Apart from writing, I'm compiling a bucket list of places I'd like to  visit...from Iceland to Hawaii and onwards....
         

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